Skilled Financial Advice Related To Wills And Trusts

As a Metairie wills and trusts attorney, R. Scott Buhrer has helped many clients effectively protect assets and make plans for future property distribution. His decades of experience allow him to evaluate each client's situation and give straightforward and cost-efficient advice. His Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree uniquely qualifies him to skillfully and effectively address the often complex financial issues involved with wills and trusts.

Valid Wills In Louisiana

It is vital to have the assistance of an attorney when drafting a will in Louisiana, so that all of the requirements of a valid will are met. If any of these requirements are not fulfilled, the will may be found invalid and its provisions may not be followed. Just a few of the requirements that are generally required for a valid will include:

  • Written: A valid will must be written. The best method for ensuring a valid will is to have it typewritten by a lawyer and to sign it in front of a notary and two witnesses. A will may also be handwritten, but there are very strict formalities that must be observed for the will to be valid.
  • Dated: A valid will must be dated, whether it is typewritten or handwritten.
  • Signature: The signature of the person making the will must appear at the end of the will and on each page thereof.
  • Notary and witnesses: A typewritten will must be signed by a notary and two witnesses at its end. The presence of the notary and two witnesses is often critical in insuring validity of the form and establishing the intentions and competency of the person signing the will.

Mr. Buhrer is able to help draft valid wills of all types. Whether working with a simple or exceptionally complex estate, he uses his in-depth understanding of the law to help clients ensure that what they want to happen with their property is what actually happens.

Trusts

Trusts also allow people to control their assets, or to protect the assets of their loved ones. Trusts are especially useful:

  • In a divorce: When they pass away, most divorced parents will have their assets go to their children. If the child is still a minor, an administrator will have control of these funds. Oftentimes, this administrator ends up being the person's former spouse because he or she now has sole custody of the children. By setting up a trust, this situation can be avoided and someone other than the ex-spouse can be named to control the child's inherited assets.
  • To prevent children from overspending: A trust can keep a child from wasting a large sum of money or other assets he or she inherits or receives from another source. Limits can be set, including preventing a child from accessing all or a part of the assets inherited until he or she turns a suitable age, normally well beyond that of majority.

Contact A New Orleans Asset Protection Attorney

To arrange an initial consultation, contact the Buhrer Law Firm online or by calling 504-541-6997 or 800-636-0784.